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The Construction Hub

Either via networking, mentoring, or tutoring, I frequently get posed with the same concern from people eager to attain employment; “How do I get a job in industry? Will I ever?” I was not immune to this. Standing at the outset of my career, I had minimal idea about how to pro-actively and effectively get my foot in the door. Everyone else was doing it – it couldn’t be rocket science, right?! It nonetheless seemed overwhelming and a far-fetched notion. Fortunately it was through a relationship at university that I was able to attain my first position.

As someone who is dedicated to demonstrating that a career in construction is a viable and rewarding career path, I’ll provide my take on how to prime yourself to be proactive in seeking employment. This list isn’t exhaustive; direct applications to companies including advertised and graduate programs are also suitable ways to go, as well as many other options not covered hereon-in.

University


So I spent a total of 1327 days committed to university. Which is a really long time to be undertaking further education. However, the value of undertaking a degree isn’t just in assignments and classes and not listening and listening and skipping class and asking your mate if you missed anything important. The days at university should be treated as one long networking event. Your behavior and how you apply yourself in class starts to build on your personal brand from day one. If you are active, engaged and ask questions, it will be noticed by your peers and professors, who have ties to industry. Your tutors and lecturers have a dense network of connections into industry – so when you are student starting out, you have the advantage of having access to that. 

Industry Associations


I cannot stress the value of being active in the industry enough through professional associations. Find an association that aligns with your values and objectives, and target those few communities where you’d like to raise your profile and build relationships. Then look for opportunities to make a contribution. There is so much value to your personal development by being curious and well-connected. I have been able to meet some exemplary people and have insightful conversations about topics I am passionate about by actively engaging in the community. This can translate to opening doors and being presented with off-market opportunities.

Mentoring

There are many entry level opportunities available to those starting out in the industry. Whether you are looking for work, or already employed, or trying to navigate your way through the start of your career, find a mentor. A mentor isn’t someone who will make career decisions for you, but they will ask you the right strategic questions to help you make one. They will lend their experience to your situation and share their lessons learned. Having a mentor can activate you capacity and capabilities to achieve more than you could have by yourself. I see mentoring as you being the CEO of your career, and mentors sit around you like a board of advisors at your ready. The better your personal brand and ability to develop relationships, the more you can achieve by being mentored. Need a mentor? Go to a networking event, you never know who you may connect with. Demonstrate your dedication to industry and reach out to someone via LinkedIn. Mentors are imperative, as they can help steer you in the right direction at the start of your career.

 I love sharing my experiences and learnings with people starting out in what can seem like a large and daunting industry. I’m available for mentoring and coaching, so get in touch if you’re looking for industry relevant advice and guidance.

Elinor Moshe. https://www.linkedin.com/in/elinor-moshe 
Posted on June 14, 2019

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